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Object Name Dress
Alternate Name Housedress
Date 1970s
Description Woman's 1-piece housedress. Printed yellow polyester / rayon fabric with flowers and birds. Dress is sleeveless, with a ruffle around the round neckline, drawn with elastic. Street-length skirt has a flounce at hemline. Two cloth labels are sewn into side seam; one has embroidered inscription: "by BARAD R" [with the R in a circle, indicating a registered trademark]; the other is printed: "50 % POLYESTER / 50 % RAYON / B-62 / CUT 6031 / STYLE 82388 / SIZE SMALL / RN 16700."
(Keywords: Fashion, Twentieth Century, Muumuu, New York)
Acquisition Gift of Edna Hayes
Ownership and History Edna Hayes (1909-1991) wore this dress in her home on Staten Island. Edna Neumann (Whittle) Hayes graduated from Curtis High School, Elmira College for Women, and Fordham Law School. She was the daughter of Joseph Neumann, a printer, and Marie Stadler Neumann. Miss Neumann was a practicing attorney and community activist by the1930s. She worked in corporate law and maintained a private practice, as well as founding Park-Stadler Inc, a Manhattan real estate management firm. In 1964 she married Francis X. Hayes at the Brick Presbyterian Church in Manhattan (both had been previously married). Mrs. Hayes was president of the Staten Island Historical Society Board of Directors from 1979 to 1989. She was honored as a Staten Island Advance Woman of Achievement in 1983.


Earliest Date 1970.0
Latest Date 1980.0
Maker Barad
Subjects Clothing & dress
Lexicon Sub-category Clothing -- Outerwear
Associated People Hayes, Edna
Catalog Number 86.073.0023
Support Acknowledgment Online Collections Database record made possible by The Coby Foundation, 2009.
Legal Status Images and text in this database are copyrighted by the Staten Island Historical Society unless otherwise noted. Items represented here are from the collections of the Staten Island Historical Society. Materials reproduced for personal non-commercial use must credit the Staten Island Historical Society. Commercial licensing is available.